Monday, July 09, 2012

Harvest

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Among the community of garden-bloggers, there's a group who diligently document their harvests every Monday.  I'm not terribly organized, and I'm not much of a "joiner" but I've always enjoyed reading about what other people are growing.  So, here's my humble contribution.

Last year, I had terrible luck with shallots and only mildly better success with garlic.  I suspect that my rock-hard soil doesn't help any crop that grows underground.  I must have missed harvesting some part of the shallots, because I've gotten a tiny volunteer crop.  This is a part of what came up, unbidden.




The meyer lemon tree is finally winding down for the season.  This tree is just amazing.  We get fruit for months and months and months.

We recently realized that someone must have stripped every single lemon off the tree when our house was being sold.  When we looked at the place three years ago, there wasn't a single ripe fruit on the tree, and we had no idea if the tree was a lemon or a lime.  I now find this very amusing, considering that Robb was so scandalized at my suggestion that we harvest the plum tree before we actually owned the house.




The plum harvest is just about finished. It's amazing to think how much the health of this tree has improved since we moved in.  Our first harvest was exactly three plums.

This year we -- almost -- had more than we knew what to do with.  Today, I'll make our last batch of jam from the plums I've been collecting in the freezer, and then we'll use the really soft fruits for wine.




Here's one of our kitchen experiments.  These are nasturtium seed pods, that we're in the process of pickling. They're currently soaking in brine, and in a few days, we'll immerse them in an herbed vinegar solution.  I saw a recipe for fermented nasturtium buds, but was scared off by the instructions that went something along the lines of, "we just sort of improvised, and when the buds got moldy we ate them."  I'm not ready to be quite that bold in the kitchen.

Overall, this summer's garden has been small and disorganized. But that's okay.  We're learning a lot, and it keeps getting better.

10 comments:

Crafty Cristy said...

Congrats on getting better harvests from your plum tree. My first harvest from the 80 year old pear tree in our yard was only 3 pears. Last year we canned 60 jars. This year, so far, we have canned 14 jars. It makes me pretty happy, I tell you.

foodgardenkitchen said...

Oh, those meyer lemons look great!

I'm originally from southern CA and I remember that so many people had citrus trees in their yards (my family included). Of course, those were in my pre-cooking and pre-gardening days so I didn't really appreciate the uniqueness of it all...

Susan Zentmyer said...

We've got a Meyer lemon tree too - and I just love it. We get so much fruit, and virtually year-round!

Jenny said...

Beautiful lemons and shallots! my tiny lemon refuses to produce anything so far.

Kate said...

Pretty shallots. I had no idea they were so shiny.

Shawn Ann said...

Interesting idea with the nasturtium. Curious how it will turn out! You have a nice harvest!

Mac said...

Cute shallots, I'm jealous of your meyer lemons, didn't know you could pickle nasturtium buds, learn something new, thanks for sharing.

Liz said...

Glad you've 'joined' in. those onions look lovely and I have very similar plates that used to be my grandmothers - exactly that shape and colour (well the same as it shows on my monitor anyway).

Michelle said...

I think Meyer lemons are the bunnies of the citrus world, they just keep producing and producing... Ooh, I do hope those nasturtium capers come out tasty!

Mary Hysong said...

Oh I love Myers! Can't really get them around here, can't wait until I have a greenhouse where I can grow one! ooooh plum wine! We used to have a Chinese restaurant that had it and it was so wonderful, like drinking honey but not quite as sweet.

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