Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Bug

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I've got some kind of summer cold, which has turned my brain to jelly, and sapped all my energy. My co-workers are dis-assembling the scenery for The Lieutenant of Inishmore and as soon as they are finished, Sheri and I will be repainting a gigantic expanse of stage floor. I'm hoping that I feel better soon, because painting an acre of shiny black without any flaws is an exhausting and daunting task under the best of circumstances.

I like the use of the word "bug" to describe an illness, or an annoyance, or any of a number of insects. I remember a visiting Belgian being irritated by the seeming inexactness of the word "bug." I suppose you could say that it bugged him (but that would be a cheap joke, and I would never do that).

The bug in the top photos is, I think, a honey bee. That would be a European species, introduced to America for agricultural purposes.




I think this bee-like bug is a native hover fly, or Syrphus opinator. More honestly, I thought it was a hover fly, and the real experts suggested the scientific name. At this stage in its life, it feeds on pollen and nectar, but when it was in its larval stage, it would have feasted on the many, many aphids in my garden. I don't use any chemical pesticides, so I have to rely on animals like this too keep the population of pests in check.




I think my garden is doing pretty well, without the use of chemical poisons.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hey Lisa and Rob!
I have another name for the hover fly, I call them "WANNA-BEE's" because they kind-a look like bee's but don't sting. yuk yuk yuk yuk.

ANYWAY, I don't leave comments often, but I always love reading your blog! Julie.

Gina said...

Ooooh! More garden pics please! It looks luscious...

And I hope your bug stops bugging you soon...

Gina

Phillip said...

Very nice bug shots! The bee is very nice.

Kristen said...

Dude, that shot of the fuzzy fuzzy honey bee is fabulous! I woulda thought you took it with a microscope. You can see the relationships between fish and amphibians, amphibians and reptiles, reptiles and birds, birds and mammals...but I always need a moment to process why so many insects are furry.

Anonymous said...

Hey, if we only had a scratch and sniff potential on my computer screen, I could find out what your flowers smell like!

Annalisa

ajt said...

i have found it amazing that many scientists use the word "bug" to refer to bacteria. it's an affectionate nickname. seems so weird to me.

mamakin said...

Sorry to hear you're under the weather. It must be a beautiful spring out there to have such beautiful flowers in your garden. I love that it's organic. When my kids were younger I always had a big garden, no pesticides, & lined the sweet 100 tomatoes, string beans, snap peas, peppers & carrots lining the outer edges of the garden. They'd 'help' me by picking them and eating them. I'd can or freeze what didn't get eaten & to this day those are the things they like to eat. Putting in a garden, even a small one, is the first thing I want to do if the implant works. I can't get over the photo you took of the bee. It's just brilliant, & nice to see. Bees are not as plentiful anymore & we can see the difference here.Wasps on the other hand are having a field day-bleh-they're just not people friendly & seem to aim for my son.
Feel better! BJ

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